Early on as we were reconstructing the scene of industrial accident with 3D computer models, we realized that the there were questions that could only be answered by the presence of a human in the model. As a result we started to use an anthropometric humanoid in our models. The 3D computer humanoid model is based on the dimensions of a 50th percentile adult male as documented in Henry Dreyfuss's human factors book, The Measure of Man and Woman: Human Factors in Design. This allows us to do several things such as see how a human form would fit in the model, or to locate the center of gravity of humanoid model in various positions. 

"Sam" (as we call this humanoid model) is scale-able so that he can be adjusted to represent a male of the desired height. Sam also has fully functioning joints so that he can be posed in any position. We also have "Bubba." He is a 50th percentile anthropometric humanoid model that has a little more body mass than Sam when that needs to be simulated.

Anthropoemtic 3D humanoid
Anthropoemtic 3D humanoid
Anthropoemtic 3D humanoid
Anthropoemtic 3D humanoid